Due to Taxotere, Some Women will Look Like Cancer Patients for the Rest of Their Lives

Due to Taxotere, Some Women will Look Like Cancer Patients for the Rest of Their Lives

Taxotere (Generic name: Docetaxel) is an intravenous chemotherapy drug that is manufactured and marketed by Sanofi-Aventi. Its use, for the treatment of breast cancer, was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 1996. It was also eventually approved by the FDA to treat other types of cancer, including non-small cell lung cancer, prostate cancer, gastric cancer, and head and neck cancer.

For women who have, or formerly had, breast cancer and had chemotherapy treatments, the most common symptom is hair loss. This, however, is just a temporary effect of chemotherapy as patients are assured that their hair will grow back from three to six months after treatment (chemotherapy targets all rapidly dividing cells – both healthy cells and cancer cells. Hair follicles, which are filled with tiny blood vessels that make hair, are among the fastest-growing cells inside the human body). However, for breast cancer patients, who have been treated with the drug Taxotere, loss of hair seems to be a permanent effect, as some have complained of no hair growth for as long as 10 years and some even longer. Worse than permanent hair loss or permanent alopecia, though is “alopecia universalis,” which is total hair loss on the scalp and on different parts of the body, including the eyebrows, eyelashes, under arms and around the genital area.

Different studies that revolved around the circumstances which affect women with breast cancer have consistently revealed that the most stressful side effect of cancer treatment is hair loss, more specifically, permanent hair loss, which results from the use of Taxotere. Breast cancer patients claim that permanent hair loss has profoundly impacted their well-being and quality of life.

Unlike women outside of the U.S. who were warned as early as 2005 of the permanent hair loss that results from the use of Taxotere, women in the U.S. were never made aware until December of 2015, after the FDA mandated Sanofi-Aventis to issue a warning about Taxotere use. Due to this concealment of information, patients were never allowed to make an an informed choice, of choosing the equally effective Paclitaxel, which did not have the same side effect.

A breast cancer drug alopecia lawsuit, which accuses Sanofi-Aventis of selling Taxotere without disclosing its dangers or risks and concealment of information from the public, is just one of the legal actions filed against the drug’s manufacturers. For women, who now suffer the damaging condition that has resulted from Taxotere use, permanent alopecia will make them look like cancer patients for the rest of their lives.

Tags

Related Posts

Share This

Xarelto: What You Need to Know Before Taking the Anticoagulant Drug

Xarelto is the leading brand of a new class of anticoagulant or blood thinning drug that was first approved by the Food and Drug Administration or FDA around 2010. While Xarelto was originally intended to prevent blood clotting complications in patients that have had knee or hip replacement surgeries, it has now been approved to prevent risks caused by abnormal blood clots common for a variety of cardiovascular issues. To be specific, the drug is often prescribed to patients with high risks of developing strokes, pulmonary embolism, and atrial fibrillation.

The brand is preferred and prescribed by a lot of physicians due to its how it provides patients with effective and fast relief. Basically, Xarelto works by slowing down the body’s production of certain types of proteins and enzymes responsible for causing blood to clot. Blood clotting is an important function in the human body, preventing people from bleeding out due to wounds and cuts. However, certain conditions can complicate this function and cause clots to form even when they should. When this happens, patients at risk of abnormal blood clotting can experience life-threatening symptoms. By taking Xarelto, these at-risk patients can be free of complications that interfere with their normal blood clotting function.

The drug has definitely proven to be effective in helping patients at risk of blood clotting issues. However, there are still some notable side effects that patients taking Xarelto need to be wary of. While some of these side effects are minor and does not outweigh the benefits caused by the drug, there are also cases when Xarelto can cause dangers that are alarming and sometimes even life-threatening. As noted on the website of the law firm of Williams Kherkher, several patients have reported cases of extreme side effects that have significantly affected their health. Some of these effects have alarmed even the FDA when it disapproved Xarelto as treatment for acute coronary syndrome.

Patients taking Xarelto should be wary of severe side effects such as brain hemorrhaging and gastrointestinal bleeding. These can be spotted through symptoms like having blood in one’s stool or urine, and vomiting or coughing up blood.

Tags

Related Posts

Share This

Dangers of Actos

Actos (pioglitazone) is a drug designed to manage blood sugar levels for diabetic patients. Manufactured by Takeda Pharmaceuticals, it has consistently been one of their bestsellers since it was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 1999. Similar drugs that predated Actos were found to cause heart problems in patients, which explain why Actos was so popular. However, there are other dangers associated with Actos that the FDA failed to detect.

About 26 million Americans or 8.3% of the US population are diabetic. While there are three different types of diabetes, 90% of the afflicted suffer from what is known as type II diabetes or diabetes mellitus. As explained on the Williams Kherkher website, type II diabetes is basically characterized by resistance of the body to insulin, the hormone that regulates the metabolism of carbohydrates. Considering that Actos brought in $2 Billion in sales in 2008, it would be reasonable to assume that a lot of people have been taking it on a regular basis.

What makes this disturbing is that there are indications that there is a link between taking Actos over a long time and bladder cancer. A study was conducted by the French in 2011, the results definitive enough to cause Actos to be pulled out of the French and eventually the German market. Ironically, it was later discovered that the active ingredient in Actos, pioglitazone, also caused cardiac problems. Soon after the FDA published the warning about Actos side effects, Takeda was inundated with pharmaceutical liability lawsuits by patients who developed complications from using Actos. Currently, 1,300 plaintiffs have joined forces in multidistrict litigation.

Litigants allege that Takeda was negligent because they failed to warn patients and doctors about about the dangers of Actos despite knowing about them since 2005. To this day the manufacturer continues to maintain that there is no definite proof that Actos causes bladder cancer.

Tags

Related Posts

Share This